Psychiatric Symptoms More Common in PWS than in Other Genetic Diseases, Study Finds

Psychiatric Symptoms More Common in PWS than in Other Genetic Diseases, Study Finds
5
(1)

Children and young adults with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) have a higher prevalence of psychiatric symptoms than their peers with other genetic disorders associated with intellectual disability (ID), a study shows.

The study, “Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis: Mental Health in Children With Neurogenetic Disorders Associated With Intellectual Disability,” was published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adult Psychiatry.

Studies have shown that aggression and self-injury are more frequently observed in PWS, Cri-du-Chat, Smith-Magenis and Cornelia de Lange syndromes than in Down and Williams syndromes.

Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is common in patients with Williams and fragile X syndromes, while those with Down syndrome are at risk for depression.

Better understanding of the prevalence and nature of psychiatric disorders and of specific genetic diseases associated with ID can help healthcare providers plan treatments and guidance. That’s “an essential task, given these syndromes typically occur rarely and are associated with substantial and complex health needs,” the researchers said.

Researchers in Australia reviewed the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and their symptoms in children and young adults with neurogenetic disorders that involve ID.

They used two online databases to search for articles on patients between the ages of 4 and 21, looking for studies that used formal psychiatric assessments or a standardized evaluation of mental health symptoms.

Overall, 39 articles were included, which provided data on 4,039 children and adolescents. Five of these studies were on PWS.

Results indicated the presence of 10 different ID-associated syndromes across all subjects with psychiatric disorders and symptoms. The five most frequently observed were PWS, Down, fragile X, Williams, and 22q11.2 deletion syndromes.

The Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) was the most frequently used tool to analyze mental health symptoms.

The prevalence of these symptoms was highest in PWS (74%).  In contrast, the prevalence of psychiatric problems was lowest in Down syndrome (32%).

The prevalence of internalizing symptoms — mood disturbance, anxiety, depression, and social withdrawal — was similar to the general population for Down syndrome patients but higher in the other syndromes, including PWS.

The prevalence of externalizing symptoms — such as aggressive behavior — relative to the general population was significantly higher (51%) in patients with PWS, but similar to the general population in the other syndromes.

The findings indicate a variable vulnerability to mental health disorders across these genetic disorders, the scientists said.

“[C]urrent findings indicate substantial psychiatric vulnerabilities, but more prevalence data are required to establish a platform to support evidence-based practice and thereafter reduce barriers to service access,” they wrote.

Iqra holds a MSc in Cellular and Molecular Medicine from the University of Ottawa in Ottawa, Canada. She also holds a BSc in Life Sciences from Queen’s University in Kingston, Canada. Currently, she is completing a PhD in Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology from the University of Toronto in Toronto, Canada. Her research has ranged from across various disease areas including Alzheimer’s disease, myelodysplastic syndrome, bleeding disorders and rare pediatric brain tumors.
Total Posts: 12
José is a science news writer with a PhD in Neuroscience from Universidade of Porto, in Portugal. He has also studied Biochemistry at Universidade do Porto and was a postdoctoral associate at Weill Cornell Medicine, in New York, and at The University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario, Canada. His work has ranged from the association of central cardiovascular and pain control to the neurobiological basis of hypertension, and the molecular pathways driving Alzheimer’s disease.
×
Iqra holds a MSc in Cellular and Molecular Medicine from the University of Ottawa in Ottawa, Canada. She also holds a BSc in Life Sciences from Queen’s University in Kingston, Canada. Currently, she is completing a PhD in Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology from the University of Toronto in Toronto, Canada. Her research has ranged from across various disease areas including Alzheimer’s disease, myelodysplastic syndrome, bleeding disorders and rare pediatric brain tumors.
Latest Posts
  • dental care and health
  • psychiatric symptoms
  • SNORD116
  • livoletide

How useful was this post?

Click on a star to rate it!

Average rating 5 / 5. Vote count: 1

No votes so far! Be the first to rate this post.

As you found this post useful...

Follow us on social media!

We are sorry that this post was not useful for you!

Let us improve this post!

Tell us how we can improve this post?